Area-wide Site Assessment
On-Call Technical Assistance Sites
Park Sites
Former Landfills
Former Gas Stations
Major Economic Development Sites
Emergency Assistance Sites

Area-wide Site Assessments

The City’s Brownfields Program has been awarded several US EPA grants to conduct site inventories to identify brownfields sites in specific neighborhoods. These projects included conducting Phase I and Phase II environmental site assessments of some sites.

Vacant Site InventoryVacant Site Inventory

This project identified vacant or derelict small sites in portions of East and Central Los Angeles. Through a US EPA Brownfields Assessment grant, the City created an abandoned/underutilized/vacant sites inventory in a user-friendly Web-based database. The inventory was developed using fire department files (where storage tank compliance violations were filed); records of underground storage tank permits; and state and county databases. City officials also conducted site visits to identify underutilized sites. This internal management and marketing inventory is accessible to City departments and can be shared with developers upon request.

LA River Survey Los Angeles River Brownfields Assessment

The project has identified potential brownfields development sites with redevelopment potential in the vicinity of the Los Angeles River/Cornfields Park area. The project was in support of the Cornfields / Arroyo Seco Specific Plan conducted by the Planning Department. Information gathered through this project is posted here.

Recent Updates

 

710 Target Area710 Corridor Initiative

This project is a multi-agency partnership aimed at improving the environment and economic conditions of low-income and minority communities along the I-710 transit corridor. The project is offering assistance to owners or operators of leaking underground tanks who have failed to comply with requirements that the tanks be removed and contamination remediated. The project is funded by the California Water Resources Control Board in partnership with the US EPA and local agencies. Within the Los Angeles portion of the Corridor the City of Los Angeles Brownfields Program is contacting owners of properties to make them aware of the funding programs that are available to assist in covering the costs of removing underground tanks as well as assessing and remediating contamination from petroleum products that were in the tanks.

Recent Updates


Wilmington & Pacoima Brownfields Assessments

In June of 2011, the City of Los Angeles was awarded a $400,000 grant to conduct site assessments and Phase I and Phase II site assessments in specific neighborhoods of Wilmington and Pacoima. In Pacoima the program has identified sites that can be redeveloped to provide new jobs or be incorporated in a greenway project that is underway along the Pacoima Wash a tributary to the Los Angeles River. In Wilmington, the project aims to reduce the impacts of pollution on the neighborhood by identifying properties that can be redeveloped with businesses that will provide new jobs and an improve community environmental conditions. In both neighborhoods, the Brownfields Program is working closely with community organizations. The project updates are posted here.

Recent Updates

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On Call Technical Assistance Sites

The purpose of on-call technical assistance is to determine preliminary site conditions and issues, current regulatory standing, and possible approaches for addressing brownfields issues on specific sites. This program offers staff expertise, legal and engineering technical assistance, and outside expert consultant resources to assist Council, Mayor’s Office and City departments and agencies as well as non-profit organizations and private property owners. Services are sometimes provided to site owners by various City departments, bureaus and Federal partners (US EPA and HUD) on a cost reimbursable basis where necessary.

When the Lula Washington Dance Theater purchased a property for the new location of their Dance Theater and Studio, they knew that the property had been used to store and repair vehicles. The location was perfect but addressing contamination on the site posed financial challenges.

The Theater is a project of the Lula Washington Contemporary Dance Foundation is a non-profit organization founded in 1980 by Lula and Erwin Washington to provide a creative outlet for minority dance artists in South Los Angeles. The Foundation has seeks to build bridges between people of different cultures and ethnic backgrounds through its inter-related parts: the professional Dance Company (Lula Washington Dance Theatre), the Youth Dance Ensemble, and the Dance Studio.

Lulu Washington Dance StudioThe Foundation sought assistance from the City’s Brownfields Program in addressing contamination at the site and a collaborative relationship has continued over several years. Brownfields staff advised approaches to applying for a US EPA Brownfields grant and the Brownfields Program supported the application as a partner. When the Dance Theater received a $200,000 Brownfields Assessment grant from the US EPA, Brownfields Staff assisted in supervised contractors who performed the site assessment and the remediation activities that followed. The brownfields Program continues to provide technical assistance as remediation continues at the site.

ARTScorpsLA

ARTScorpsLA is another example of a non-profit community organization receiving assistance from the Los Angeles Brownfields Program. ARTScorpsLA has a variety of art-centered projects in low income neighborhoods of Los Angeles. They create parks and other spaces where families and youth can come together for celebrations, art classes and other cultural experiences. Their plans to develop a low-income housing project were delayed due to possible contamination on their property. The Brownfields Program provided a Phase II site assessment and will assist in identifying funds for cleanup.

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Park Sites

Background

The City of Los Angeles has made the creation of open space a priority because it provides citizens with opportunities for recreation and interaction and noticeably improves the environment. These projects can help to meet the region's open space needs and provide important greening-linkages to existing natural amenities, such as the Los Angeles River, and to transportation corridors, such as bus and light rail stops, freeways, bikeways and hiking trails. The Brownfields Program works collaboratively with the Department of Recreation and Parks, to identify and obtain funds to address contamination at existing parks sites and also to develop new parks on former brownfields sites. Some of the amenities that have been enhanced or provided are playgrounds, sport fields, trails, meeting places, picnic facilities, public art, and many others.

Damson Oil

The Damson Oil site in Venice was turned into a beachfront skate park. The Brownfields Program funded cleaning up oil storage and drilling infrastructure, including removal of underground storage tanks. The site is now a skate park that is part of a multipurpose recreation center that includes picnic areas and children’s play areas, sports fields, and more.
Venice Skate Park
Photos by JuanCarlos Chan / Los Angeles Dept. of Recreation and Parks

Rockwood Park

Following tenant complaints of methane and hydrogen sulfide gas leaks, Councilman Eric Garcetti worked with the Brownfields Program to obtain funding for assessment and cleanup of this former oil drilling site. The City purchased adjacent properties and construction of a new half-acre park was completed in May of 2011.
Rockwood Park
Photos by JuanCarlos Chan / Los Angeles Dept of Recreation and Parks

Gaffey Welcome Park

The Gaffey Welcome Park was constructed on the site of a dilapidated, abandoned gas station that for many years was an eyesore at the very entrance to San Pedro. The Brownfields Program worked with community members, Council District 15 and the former Community Redevelopment Agency of Los Angeles to overcome barriers to developing this site. The Brownfields Program helped to obtain a US EPA UST fields grant to pay for removal of underground tanks from the site. The Community Redevelopment Agency of Los Angeles (CRA/LA) eventually purchased the site and transformed it into a beautiful park welcoming visitors and residents to San Pedro.
Welcome Park
Photos by JuanCarlos Chan / Los Angeles Dept of Recreation and Parks

Bandini Canyon Pocket Park

The Bandini Canyon Pocket Park was an undeveloped long, narrow 7.4 acre property stretching along four blocks of a residential neighborhood. It has now been developed into a linear park with a beautiful walking trail. This park is located just west of the Gaffey Welcome Park. At the very early stages of this project, the Brownfields Program funded a Phase I site assessment that determined there were no contamination issues at the site.
Bandini Canyon Park
Photos by JuanCarlos Chan / Los Angeles Dept. of Recreation and Parks

Wetlands Park

The Wetlands Park was constructed on the former site of a Metropolitan Transit Authority vehicle maintenance and storage yard. The Brownfields Program applied for a grant and received $200,000 from the US EPA to pay for cleanup at this site. The site is developed as a nine acre park that provides an open space and recreation in a densely occupied neighborhood that lacks adequate park space. The Wetlands Park incorporates a constructed wetland that cleans storm drain water and attracts wildlife. A portion of water flows from a local storm drain, which gets treated and then routed to the park’s wetland area. The wetlands provides supplemental polishing of storm water flow so that the water can be used for irrigation and other suitable water re-use within the project area, or discharged back to the storm drain. The Park has been open since February of 2012.
Wetlands Park

Chatsworth

At Chatsworth Park, the discovery of lead contamination from a former shooting range has caused portions of the park to be closed until the site can be fully assessed and remediated. The Brownfields Program applied for and was awarded a Targeted Site Assessment grant for $75,000 in services from the California Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC). A DTSC contractor performed an environmental investigation. The Brownfields Program is seeking additional funds to complete cleanup at this site.
Chatsworth Park

East Wilmington Park

A sports field complex is planned for development at East Wilmington Park. An indoor recreation center has been constructed across the street from the planned park. To assist with the development, the Brownfields Program utilized funds from a US EPA Brownfields Grant funds which were used to help pay for a Phase II site assessment to define contamination at this site.

To learn more about the City's parks and recreation areas,
contact the City's Department of Recreation and Parks.

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Former Landfill Sites

Background

Former landfills present particular brownfield challenges, including the need to monitor groundwater and to vent methane gas produced as the underground waste decays. The Brownfields Team works closely with the City's Local Enforcement Agency to manage such issues when former landfill sites become available for redevelopment. Currently, two former landfill sites are included in the City's Brownfields Program.

 

Sheldon-ArletaSheldon

Sheldon Arleta landfill is located at 12600 West Sheldon St. in Sun Valley near the intersection of the Hollywood and Golden State Freeways. This a forty-acre site owned by the City's Bureau of Sanitation. The Brownfields Program applied for and received a grant from the California Waste Management Board to move the gas control system to the edge of the property so that a park could be developed at the site. A baseball park for youth major baseball will be built at this site.
Click here for more information on this site.

Delano Park
Delano Park Building
Photos by JuanCarlos Chan / Los Angeles Dept. of Recreation and Parks

The Delano Park is located at 15100 Erwin Street in Van Nuys, adjacent a shopping complex and across the street from an elementary school. The site was operated as a landfill from the 1950s to1970s. The site is owned by the City's Department of Recreation and Parks and includes a recreation center with ball fields, a playground, and dog-walking area. When plans were made to expand park facilities, there was a need to perform environmental assessments, including assessments of lead and methane. These studies provided information to the Department of Recreation and Parks that was utilized in planning its expansion of park facilities and the construction of a gymnasium building. State-of-the-art ventilation systems are an example of the building's amenities, which are designed for compatibility with the site's former land use.

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Former Gas Stations

 

Former Gas StationThe City has many former gas station sites that are abandoned, vacant or economically underutilized. Usually a contributing factor is the presence of Underground Storage Tanks (USTs), formerly used to store gasoline. State law required that these tanks be upgraded or removed by 1998. Former gas stations may now be vacant for a variety of reasons including: the owner cannot afford the cost of removing USTs or the contamination they may have caused, the owner fears discovery of contamination that they will then have to remove, or owners have decided it is their interest to do nothing at this time. The presence of USTs is a barrier to most re-use transactions due to regulatory and financial uncertainty. Therefore, former gas station sites, even if currently being utilized for economic activity can become a neighborhood nuisance in the future if USTs are not removed and contamination addressed. The Brownfields Program goal is inform owners of the programs that are available to help cover the costs of removing USTs and contamination, facilitate removal of USTs, assist owners in addressing contamination, and help identify redevelopment uses for these sites.

Gas Station Guide

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Major Economic Development Sites

The purpose of the Major Economic Development Sites category is to generate economic development and job creation at specific major development sites.

Wilmington Map

Two examples are:

Wilmington Industrial Park

The Wilmington Industrial Park is a 232-acre industrial center located very close to the country’s largest point of entry for imported materials, the Ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach. The ports also provide convenient access to shipping your goods to the world market. Wilmington Industrial Park is also located near the Alameda Corridor, a state-of-the-art rail cargo expressway which links the ports with the entire U.S. through the transcontinental rail network.

Goodyear Tract

The Goodyear Tract is a 208-acre industrial area located in South Central Los Angeles near the Alameda Corridor. This area is occupied by 325 small industrial businesses, with many small vacant properties and surrounded by residential neighborhoods. A portion of the site was the historic home of the Goodyear factory that closed in 1979. Past manufacturing and industrial uses and the presence of railroad tracks behind the buildings, previously used for bulk loading and unloading of chemical compounds, have raised questions about possible soil contamination. The Brownfields Program has assisted this site by conducting Phase I and Phase II site assessments on properties proposed for redevelopment and applying for grant funds to clean up contaminated sites.

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Emergency Sites

Background

The Brownfields Program is available to assist City agencies when emergencies arise that involve contaminated properties. These may be cases where the public brings a contamination issue to the attention of a City department which then needs to respond quickly to address community concerns. Below are some examples of such sites where the Brownfields Program was able to quickly step in and provide technical information and funding to take quickly assess the danger so that appropriate action could be taken to protect the public.

Chatsworth Park
Chatsworth Park South is located in the City of Los Angeles San Fernando Valley. The Park consists of 21 acres of gently sloping land with recreation facilities, children’s play area, tennis and basketball courts, and landscaped fields surrounded by undeveloped hillsides with hiking trails.

In 2007, the Department of Recreation and Parks needed to respond to community complaints about lead in the soil. A review of the site’s history revealed that the likely source was lead shot scattered around the site when it was operated as a shooting range in the 1950s. Sampling of the soil showed significant lead contamination, leading to closure of the park. The park will remain closed until a cleanup is completed.

The City’s Brownfields Program was able to provide technical assistance and identify funding for further site investigation. The Brownfields Program wrote a successful application for assistance from the California Department of Toxic Substances Targeted Site Investigation Program. The grant funded sample collection and analysis to determine the extent of lead contamination and will help in the development of cleanup and mitigation strategies. Human health and ecological risk assessments were conducted and a cleanup plan is in the development stage. The goal is to return Chatsworth Park to the community to enjoy. The Brownfields Program will continue to provide assistance until the successful reopening of this much needed community park.

Oakridge Fire

Oakridge Fire

In November of 2008, wildfires burned approximately 500 of 600 mobile homes at the Oakridge Mobile home Park. The Brownfields Program provided emergency Phase II sampling and analysis of ash and soil at the site and storm-water leaving the site to assess the presence of heavy metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and asbestos. This work was done to protect the health and safety of surrounding residents and to mitigate any potential environmental damage from the storm-water carrying these materials into the ocean.

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Contacts
For more information on the City's Brownfields Program please contact: 
Nuna.Tersibashian@lacity.org
or Solid Resources Citywide Recycling Division at (213) 485-2260.

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